John Germov

John Germov

John Germov

is Professor of Sociology, Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at Charles Sturt University. He is a former President of the Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (DASSH), a former President of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA), and served on the Executive of the International Sociological Association. In 2010, he received the Outstanding Service to the Australian Sociological Association Award. His research interests span the social determinants of health, with a particular focus on food and alcohol consumption in the context of public health. John has published 24 books to date, including Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology (6th edn, Oxford University Press, 2019; 2nd Canadian edn 2017), A Sociology of Food and Nutrition: The Social Appetite (with Lauren Williams, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, 2017), Histories of Australian Sociology (with Tara McGee, Melbourne University Publishing, 2005), and Hunter Wine: A History (with Julie McIntyre, NewSouth Publishing, 2018).

Marilyn Poole

Marilyn Poole

Marilyn Poole

is an Honorary Associate Professor of Sociology at Deakin University. Although now retired, she continues to write and do research on ageing. Her recent research has been on the working lives of older women and a community research project on baby boomers and volunteering. She serves on the Board of Directors of, and works as a volunteer in, a not-for-profit organisation that offers programs and services for socially isolated older people. Marilyn has long experience in the community sector and continues to work on advisory committees, particularly in the areas of health and community strengthening. She is author of Idols–Ideals–Identities: Women in Society (John Wiley & Sons, 1986), co-editor of A Certain Age: Women Growing Older (with Susan Feldman, Allen & Unwin, 1999) and Sociology: Australian Connections (with Ray Jureidini, Allen & Unwin, 2003), and editor of Family: Changing Families, Changing Times (Allen & Unwin, 2005). She was a member of the Professional Education Taskforce that produced Family Violence: Everybody’s Business, Somebody’s Life.

About the Contributors

Janeen Baxter

is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course in the Institute for Social Science Research at the University of Queensland. Janeen has research interests in social disadvantage, family, gender, and the life-course, and has published widely in these areas. Janeen is an elected fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, a former member and Chair of the ARC Social, Behavioural and Economic Sciences College of Experts, and a former member and Chair of the Households, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Expert Advisory Group. She is currently leading the evaluation for the Australian Government’s Try, Test and Learn initiative and is a member of the Advisory Board for the Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study.

Julia Coffey

is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her research and publications in sociology are focused on themes of youth health, gender, and the body. Her research monograph Body Work: Youth, Gender and Health (2016) is published by Routledge, and she has co-edited Learning Bodies: The Body in Youth and Childhood Studies (2016), published by Springer.

Maria Freij

is a Senior Lecturer in English at Kristianstad University, Sweden, where she works as Head of Programme Area and Head of Division of the Humanities. She is a Conjoint Senior Lecturer at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her sociological interests focus on the representations of health and identity, and in her other career her interests span creative writing, literature, and linguistics. Her primary interests lie in the area of (meta)nostalgia and representations of past and present internal and external childhood landscapes, on which she has presented and published internationally. Her work appears in, among other journals, Meanjin, Blue Dog, Softblow Poetry Journal, Mascara, TEXT, Australian Journal of French Studies, and Southerly. Maria translates between English, Swedish, and French, and her translation of Boris Vian’s posthumous collection of poetry is published in Boris Vian: Poetry and Short Fiction (Adelaide University Press, 2013). Her book of poems is forthcoming from Puncher & Wattmann Press (Sydney).

John Germov

is Professor of Sociology, Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at Charles Sturt University, Australia. He is a former President of the Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (DASSH), a former Presi-dent of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA), and served on the Executive of the International Sociological Association. In 2010, he received the Outstanding Service to the Australian Sociological Association Award. His research interests span the social determinants of health, with a particular focus on food and alcohol consumption in the context of public health. John has published 24 books to date, including Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology (6th edn, Oxford University Press, 2019; 2nd Canadian edn 2017), A Sociology of Food and Nutrition: The Social Appetite (with Lauren Williams, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, 2017), Histories of Australian Sociology (with Tara McGee, Melbourne University Publishing, 2005), and Hunter Wine: A History (with Julie McIntyre, NewSouth Publishing, 2018).

Meredith Green

was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centre for Social Research at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia, where her research interests focused on Indigenous and non-Indigenous race relations in Australia, in particular issues of inequality and the notion of whiteness. To pursue these interests in practice, she completed a Masters of Teaching and has since worked in the areas of education and community services.

Akane Kanai

is a Lecturer in the School of Media, Film and Journalism at Monash University whose research focuses on gendered digital cultures, affect, and identity. She is author of the research monograph Gender and Relatability: Managing Affect, Intimacy and Value in Digital Culture published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Deborah Lupton

is Centenary Research Professor in the News and Media Research Centre, Faculty of Arts and Design, University of Canberra. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, leader of the Smart Technology Living Lab at the University of Canberra, and the co-leader
of the Digital Data and Society Consortium. Her latest books are Digital Sociology (Routledge, 2015), The Quantified Self (Polity, 2016), and Digital Health (Routledge, 2017), as well as the edited volumes Digitised Health, Medicine and Risk (Routledge, 2016), The Digital Academic (Routledge, 2017, co-edited with Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson), and Self-Tracking, Health and Medicine (2017). Her current research interests all involve aspects of digital sociology: digital health, digital data cultures, self-tracking practices, digital food cultures, digitised academia, and the digital surveillance of children and young people.

Samantha Mannix

is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Her doctoral research is a qualitative project drawing on contemporary gender, sexuality, and sociological theories to explore how young people understand and experience intimate and romantic relationships in the contemporary sociopolitical context.

Timothy Marjoribanks

joined Swinburne University of Technology in September 2017 as Professor of Management and Associate Dean (Research and Development) in the Faculty of Business and Law. His research and teaching engage with debates in organisational innovation and transformation, and management and leadership practice, both in Australia and internationally, with a particular focus on the media industry and journalism, sport and new technologies. Tim graduated with a PhD in Sociology from Harvard University after completing honours degrees in Law and Arts (majoring in Politics) at the University of Adelaide.

Tara Renae McGee

is an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University, where she teaches research methods and developmental criminology courses. Tara is the President of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology and the founding co-editor (with Paul Mazerolle) of the Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology (2015–2019). Her research focuses on human development using longitudinal research methods and is positioned within a developmental and life-course criminology framework.

Julie McLeod

researches in the history and sociology of education, with a focus on curriculum, youth, citizenship, and educational reform. She is Professor of Curriculum, Equity and Social Change in the University of Melbourne Graduate School of Education and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research Capability), University of Melbourne. Recent publications include Uneven Space-Times of Education: Historical Sociologies of Concepts, Methods and Practices (Routledge, 2018), Rethinking Youth Wellbeing: Critical Perspectives (Springer, 2015), and The Promise of the New and Genealogies of Educational Reform (Routledge, 2015).

Peter Mewett

now retired, has taught and researched in Britain and Australia.His research took him from the islands of Scotland to remote towns in northern Australia before he turned to the study of sport with an ethnographic study of professional running in Victoria. Subsequently, he has done historical sociological research on the origins and development of sports training in modernity and, most recently, collaborative research on women sports fans with Kim Toffoletti. Peter’s many publications, found as book chapters and refereed journal articles, cover a wide range of sports and non-sports topics. His most recent significant publication is Sport and Its Female Fans (Routledge, 2012), which he co-edited with Kim Toffoletti.

Pam Nilan

is Professor of Sociology at the University of Newcastle, Australia. She has published widely on youth in Australia, Indonesia, Fiji, and Vietnam. She is the co-author of five books on youth and has just completed a study of environmentalism among young people in Indonesia. Her current research is on far-right youth vigilante groups in Australia.

Jan Pakulski

is Professor Emeritus at the University of Tasmania, Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, and an Affiliate of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. He is author or co-author of Postmodernization: Change in Advanced Society (Sage, 1992), The Death of Class (Sage, 1996), Postcommunist Elites and Democracy in Eastern Europe (St Martin’s Press, 1998), Globalizing Inequalities (Allen & Unwin, 2004), Toward Leader Democracy (Anthem Press, 2013), and The Visegrad Countries in Crisis (Collegium Civitas, 2016).

Marilyn Poole

is an Honorary Associate Professor in Sociology at Deakin University. Although now retired, she continues to write and do research on ageing. Her recent research has been on the working lives of older women and a community research project on baby boomers and volunteering. She serves on the Board of Directors of, and works as a volunteer in, a not-for-profit organisation that offers programs and services for socially isolated older people. Marilyn has long experience in the community sector and continues to work on advisory committees, particularly in the areas of health and community strengthening. She is author of Idols–Ideals–Identities: Women in Society (John Wiley & Sons, 1986), co-editor of A Certain Age: Women Growing Older (with Susan Feldman, Allen & Unwin, 1999) and Sociology: Australian Connections (with Ray Jureidini, Allen & Unwin, 2003), and editor of Family: Changing Families, Changing Times (Allen & Unwin, 2005). She was a member of the Professional Education Taskforce that produced Family Violence: Everybody’s Business, Somebody’s Life.

Sharyn L. Roach Anleu

is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor at Flinders University, Adelaide. A Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and a past President of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA), Sharyn has a longstanding interest in the sociology of deviance, regulation, and social control. With Professor Kathy Mack, she is currently engaged in national sociolegal research on judicial officers and their courts.

Sherry Saggers

is Adjunct Professor at the National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, where she created the research program ‘Prevention, Early Intervention and Inequality’. She was formerly Foundation Professor of Applied Social Research and Director of the Centre for Social Research at Edith Cowan University. An anthropologist, she has worked with and for Indigenous communities throughout Australia for more than 30 years. She has published widely on Indigenous issues, including health, substance misuse, education, youth leadership, community development, and political economy.

Andrew Singleton

is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Research at Deakin University. His research interests in the sociology of religion include secularisation, youth religion, personal belief, and alternative religions. Andrew has published extensively in these areas, both nationally and internationally. He is the co-author (with Michael Mason and Ruth Webber) of The Spirit of Generation Y: Young People’s Spirituality in a Changing Australia (Garrett Publishing, 2007) and the author of Religion, Culture and Society: A Global Approach (Sage, 2014).

Zlatko Skrbiš

is Professor in Sociology in the School of Social Sciences and Senior Pro Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at Monash University. He is renowned for his work in the fields of migration, cosmopolitanism, and social theory, and leads the longitudinal ARC Discovery Project ‘Social Futures and Life Pathways of Young People in Queensland’. Zlatko is the author of several books on nationalism, nation-building, and cosmopolitanism, most recently Cosmopolitanism: Uses of the Idea (with Ian Woodward, Sage/TCS, 2013).

Jonathan Smith

is a Research Fellow in Sociology at the School of Social Sciences, Monash University. Much of his work examines processes of change in social and political attitude formation within communities and across the life-course. He is a Chief Investigator on the Australian Community Capacity Study, which examines racial and cultural exclusivism in Melbourne, Australia. He also administers the Social Futures and Life Pathways of Young People (‘Our Lives’) project, a longitudinal ARC Discovery Project tracking the careers and attitudes of young people growing up in Queensland.

Mark Western

is the Director of the Institute for Social Science Research at the University of Queensland and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. He has research interests in social inequality and social stratification, the sociology of education, quantitative research methods, and the impact and public value of the social sciences. He has published seven books and over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and commissioned reports. In 2012, he chaired the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative’s Research and Evaluation Committee for Education and Human Society, and in 2015 and 2016 he was one of two Deputy Chairs of the Australian Council of Learned Academies’ Review of the Research Training System.

Ian Woodward

is Professor at the Department of Marketing and Management, University of Southern Denmark. He was trained in sociology at the University of Queensland and taught at Griffith University for 12 years. He has research interests in the sociology of consumption and material culture and in the cultural dimensions of cosmopolitanism. His critical survey of the field of material culture studies, Understanding Material Culture, was published by Sage in 2007. He is co-author of The Sociology of Cosmopolitanism (Palgrave, 2009) and, with Zlatko Skrbiš, authored Cosmopolitanism: Uses of the Idea (Sage/TCS, 2013). Most recently he published the co-authored book Vinyl: The Analogue Record in the Digital Age with Dominik Bartmanski (Bloomsbury, 2015) and the co-edited books The Festivalization of Culture (Ashgate, 2014) and Cosmopolitanism, Markets and Consumption (Palgrave, 2018). He holds faculty adjunct positions at Griffith University and the Yale University Center for Cultural Sociology.